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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
is james clapper, a former three-star military man from the pentagon. under him are 16 intelligence agencies and the cia is one of those before that, the director of central intelligence had nominally have the coordination role. now, the cia is one of 16 but it is our primary spy agency. its role under the reorganization has become even more crucial. if you have seen "zero dark thirty," it shows the central the cia played in identifying the career and once we identified him, we found the house in about a block and then we found osama bin laden. host: senator john mccain said he wants to take a closer look at the interrogation policies of the bush administration and john brennan's involvement in that. guest: i applaud with john mccain said about interrogation. he has been saying for ever that torture does not work and he should know. he was in the hanoi hilton for so long and tortured by north vietnam during the war. he is right, in my view. i did serve on the intelligence committee for eight years. i was there in the 1990's and came back and was a ranking member. i think we should l
in one of the pentagon's recruiting commercials. >> boxing those up, getting those out today. >> reporter: but what he has been doing for two years in this vast, unheated warehouse in oakland, california, has provided crucial supplies for thousands of men and women in uniform and in harm's way. trauma kits and stretchers. ballistic eye protection. and tarps to repair ripped tents. spare parts for a failing generator that would have taken months for the regular supply chain to provide. >> this generator powers their communications, their intelligence, their daily operations, everything. we're literally able to ship it to them within 72 hours. >> reporter: it all started when one of nearborn's marine pals deployed to afghanistan and asked for some needed items. nearborn sent them. word got around through e-mails and a new website there was an outfit called troops direct that could bypass the usual military red tape and get you what you and your unit needed pronto. like this sergeant who told us via skype from afghanistan that nearborn had shipped plumbing supplies for clothes washers and ho
and the policies and decision-making that formally had been with the pentagon. and it has been a cia mission, as you know, in large parts of pakistan and yemen and other places. so seeing how john brennan now in his new perch, if he is confirmed, and he was a career, 25-year career person at the cia and today they are welcoming him home if he gets confirmed, it's going to be very interesting to see how he decides to rebalance that, and whether he does move it back to the pentagon. >> so much attention on the hagel side of this has been paid to the relative handful of republican senators who have been complaining about chuck hagel and the conservative media figures who have been complaining. this one of the things where we're getting a squeaky wheel getting a lot of the attention? my thoughts about chuck hagel is he a consummate beltway choice. even if he does have his loud republican critics. what is your sense of the magnitude of the opposition to him? >> well, it's always very hard to predict when the opposition is going to achieve critical mass. he has extraordinarily deep roots, as you p
with the president's national security team telling the pentagon to send them recommendations that would involve no more than 9,000 troops. and leaking on the eve of karzai's arrival that the white house was considering a zero option. >> starting this spring, our troops will have a different mission. training, advising, assisting afghan forces. >> today hi announced it would transition ahead of schedule. plans that worry many in the pentagon as the president weighs how many troops to leave behind. the theory of zero troop option leaving no behind was a bluff to ensure they would grant immunity after 2014. >> nowhere do we have security agreement with country without immunity for the troops. i think president karzai understands that. >> we understand that the issue is specific importance for the united states. >> the quid pro quo is karzai will return to afghanistan with the promise that the afghan prisons will return to afghan sovereignty and pull out of the afghan vil lanels this spring. president diverted attention from those asking whether 11 years of war were worth it. who helped repel large
. u.s. troops are now to shift to a support role this spring. months earlier than the pentagon originally predicted. the president made that announcement after meeting with his counterpart from afghanistan. harmid karzai at the white house. >> starting this spring, our troops will have a different mission. training, advising, assisting, afghan forces. it will be historic moment. >> most of the 66,000 combat troops in afghanistan are set to leave at the end of next year. the president says he has not yet decided whether to speed up that down draw or how many american force also stay around after 2014. this week at the white house said it would consider leaving zero ground troops behind but that was largely seen as a negotiating employee with the afghans. the president is keeping the option on the table, probably for that reason. jennifer griffin at the pentagon. is he also promising the afghans a strategic partisanship, what's -- partnership. >> the strategic partnership how many troops can say post 2014. the real question is whether they be given immunity. that whole zero optio
, if you like, leaving no troops behind in afghanistan. what's the pentagon think of that and a lot of these people say that really complaint hean'. >> i would say at this point everything is probably still on the table, but you're right, that number zero definitely raise some had eyebrows inside the pentagon. in fact during a press conference yesterday, leon panetta said the stronger position that we take about staying committed and staying in afghanistan, you know, that's how we're going to ultimately get a political reconciliation. in other words, he felt that signaling that the u.s. may pull out all of its troops would weaken the negotiating position about those negotiations with the taliban ever got started again. now, the taliban, that's been one of their demands. all u.s. troops leave afghanistan after 2014. and there are some who feel the white house 234r0floated this io sort of, you know, lay the ground work to get some perhaps concessions on some other issues that are important to the white house. in other words, more of a negotiati negotiati negotiating ploy. >> it's been
from the pentagon and our commanders on the ground in terms of what that would look like. and when we have more information about that, i will be describing that to the american people. >> woodruff: in november, the u.s. and afghanistan started negotiations on a so-called "bilateral security agreement" to govern any future american military role. u.s. officials have insisted that any troops who do stay must have legal protection, as the president said again today. >> we have arrangements like this with countries all around the world, and nowhere do we have any kind of security agreement with a country without immunity for our troops. >> woodruff: in turn, karzai said now that the transition is being expedited, the immunity question may no longer be a sticking point. >> i can go to the afghan people and argue for immunity for u.s. troops in afghanistan in a way that afghan sovereignty will not be compromised, in a way that afghan law will not be compromised. >> woodruff: back in kabul, the questions of whether u.s. troops remain, and how many and under what conditions, have divided afg
for the pentagon job. general, welcome. thank you very much. >> nice to be with you. thank you. >> tell me why you think chuck hagel is the right person for this job despite all the controversy that has been raised about what he said about israel in the past and iran in the past, criticisms of some of his other statements certainly the statements about gay americans. >> i think for two, maybe three reasons. first of all, he is a very solid, sound thinker. he has been involved in these matters for decades. he comes at decisions by analysis. not by a mee jerk support for this philosophy or that, but what is best for the united states. that's a wonderful attitude, and i think he and john kerry have similar points of view, and they'll be a good team. but, secondly, he is -- he would be the first secretary of defense to have served as an enlisted man in the trenches. from uso to veterans administration, he understands the political and human problems in a way that no other secretary has. >> do you think that he has the experience and the skill to get his arms around that pentagon bureaucracy and all th
, but the blowback on the ground is something that -- can be furious and last friday i was at the pentagon talking to the joint chiefs legal advisor who we talked about this at length. one of the things that they try to do as they analyze and propose strike, what's the blowback going to be. >> on the ground. >> on the ground. you can hit a guy in the house, but if all the neighbors -- if that causes them to go join the taliban, you know, you have taken a big step backwards. he was trying to persuade me that they pay attention to that when they're looking at a proposed strike, but the problem is how can do you that from washington? very, very difficult. the evidence so far is in yemen, for example, enormous blowback. you know, the analysis that i've seen is that we've caused more harm than good there. >> ben, i wonder, the other -- there is blowback regionally, but there has been such a lack of discussion here, and i remember the "new york times" kill list story that raised hackles in the administration. mr. obama is the liberal law professor who campaigned against the iraq war and torture and then
the pentagon will start taking steps to freeze hiring and scaled back spending amid what he calls a perfect storm of budget unis certainty. they cannot make any long-range plans because congress hasn't passed the appropriations bill for 2013. pentagon spending is frozing at last year's levels. sequestration to the tune of half a trillion dollars over ten years are set to start in march unless congress does something and secretary panetta is not pleased. >> we no have idea what the hell is going to happen. all tolled, this uncertainty if left unresolved by the congress will seriously harm our military readiness. >> shepard: defense officials already ordered the air force and the navy to cancel maintenance on its aircraft and ships. but secretary panetta says he has asked defense leaders to ensure that any moves they make now should be reversible if at all possible. >>> the president today welcomed hamid karzai to the house to discuss the future of our longest war in which more than 3,000 americans and allied military personnel have been killed. the president said all forces in afghanistan wi
of national intelligence. the current one is james clapper, a former three-star military man from the pentagon. under him are 16 intelligence agencies and the cia is one of those before that, the director of central intelligence had nominally have the coordination role. now, the cia is one of 16 but it is our primary spy agency. its role under the reorganization has become even more crucial. if you have seen "zero dark thirty," it shows the central the cia played in identifying the career and once we identified him, we found the house in about a block and then we found osama bin laden. host: senator john mccain said he wants to take a closer look at the interrogation policies of the bush administration and john brennan's involvement in that. guest: i applaud with john mccain said about interrogation. he has been saying for ever that torture does not work and he should know. he was in the hanoi hilton for so long and tortured by north vietnam during the war. he is right, in my view. i did serve on the intelligence committee for eight years. i was there in the 1990's and came back and was a rank
portnoy, who democrats were looking at undersecretary of defense, hoping she might move to the pentagon and overlooked for that position and susan rice now out of the running. the question, do we have enough bench of women. the cabinet positions, it's long hours, my intern went over to the white house and works 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and for a woman would children, how do we work them so women can do them. >> megyn: and talking about this on the air yesterday, i'm a relatively young mother and i would not do a job that would require 12 and 16 hours a day regularly. i'd never see my kid. women make that trade off and men, too, but women. and however, ben, look at the women in the cabinet. hillary clinton in her 60's and janet napolitano i think she's not married and you know, you can find women who could do the job who aren't necessarily young mothers, it's not like there's an absence of qualified available women out there. so why isn't he finding them? >> well, i think he's finding people he's comfortable with. and that's the problem when you make laws based on political gain. and the preside
, chuck hagel, to run the pentagon, president obama pulling out all troops by 2014, not leaving any military presence behind. that idea was floated at the white house earlier this week. we'll also talk to general stanley mcchrystal about that, and the weapons he used during his long career and whether civilians ought to be able to use weapons. you made headlines, what is your view when you see the military-style weapons in the hands of civilians? >> i spent a lifetime of carrying weapons, and firing a round at 3,000 feet per second. and when it hits human flesh it is devastating, designed to be that way. and that is what i want soldiers to carry. but i don't want those weapons around our schools or around our streets. i think that if we can't -- it is not a complete fix to just address assault weapons. but i think if we don't get very serious now when we see children being buried, then i can't think of a time when we should. >> so you don't buy the argument that the only good answer to a bad guy with a gun is good guy with a gun? >> i don't, and i think it is time we have a serious
regarding pentagon. i think it is a controversial choice. a >> speaking to meet the press last month, president obama defended senator hagel's record. >> i know chuck hagel. he is a patriot. he is someone who has done extraordinary work in the united states senate. he served this country with valor in vietnam. he is someone who is currently serving on my intelligence advisory board and doing an outstanding job. >> to talk more about the nomination of chuck hagel as secretary of defense, we are joined now by ali gharib writes a middle east blog on the daily beast website. welcome to "democracy now!" talk about the controversy around hagel's in in today by president obama or nominated. >> they floated -- the administration floated his name last month and there's been a firestorm of criticism since then that is come mostly from right-wing republicans, but also a little from pro-israel democratics that is based around his views on israel, iran, some comments he made about a decade ago about a gay nominee to the ambassador the last to be ambassador, and just general right wing republican
of the environmental protection agency. along with the president's earlier nominations-- for state, the pentagon and the c.i.a.-- that's raised questions about a loss of diversity in the cabinet. but yesterday, white house spokesman jay carney said the president's record on diversity should speak for itself. >> i mean, the increase in the representation of women in senior positions is dramatic-- it's consistent with or greater than president clinton's staff as well. >> brown: whatever the criticisms, the lew nomination is an early favorite to win senate confirmation. there's no word yet on when his confirmation hearings will begin. >> woodruff: for a closer look at jack lew and what his selection says about the president's economic agenda, we turn to two guests who have followed his career. jared bernstein worked with him in the white house as the economic adviser to vice president biden. and juliana goldman has long reported on his role as white house reporter for "bloomberg news." juliana, you describe jack lew as the president's consummate aide. what did you mean by that? >> he's one of the p
week. earlier today, at the pentagon the secretary of the air force michael donley talked to reporters. he was joined by air force chief of staff general mark welsh and this is 45 minutes. >> good morning, all. thanks for being here. the chief and i thought this would be a valuable opportunity to begin the new year by sitting down with you to discuss the state of our air force and the issues and challenges we expect to address in the year ahead and beyond. to start i would like to thank the senate approving the national defense thorgs act. and thanks to the president for signing the bill into law. this important legislation provides policy guidance that enables d.o.d. to provide for our fighters and their families and to protect the american people. it demonstrated strong bipartisan commitment to national security. we hope this success may spur progress on critical issues that still remain. those issues include issues to develop a balanced deficit plan. a final f.y. 13 appropriation bill to replace the continued resolution and the president's f.y. 14 budget. congress' recent decision t
on my show, colonel ellen herring, one of two women suing the pentagon for discrimination saying all the jobs should be open to everyone, men, women, the standards shouldn't be lowered, it should be one single standard. how can you help make that happen? >> well first of all, april makes ten years for me serving in the army national guard. we have women who have been serving in combat roles for a long time whether it has been under a combat title or not. if we look back to the civil war, we had women who were disguising themselves as men, so they could serve. we have in hawaii two brigades who have females who are serving in infantry units, and i think there is so much room for progress and we just need to make the connection from reality of the roles that women are already playing in our military and perception, where people don't have as close an understanding of the great contributions and sacrifices that women have been making for our country for a very long time. >> okay. >> that's what i'm excited about. i'm able to bring my own firsthand experience, my own deployments to the f
at the pentagon, the state at the white house. on friday he will be speaking at georgetown university about u.s.-afghan relations. we will have coverage of his comments at 5:03 p.m. eastern. >> next, analysis on how the fiscal could deal will affect the defense budget. and addresses by bob mcdonnell and andrew cuomo. >> i think the collectivization of the minds of americans oppose the founding fathers as particularly dangerous because -- america's founding fathers is a dangerous because they were not a collective unit. presenting them as such tends to dramatically over simplify the politics of the founding generation. it comes to be used as a big battering ram to beat people over the head with an ways that are unsound. >> michael austin on what he calls the deep historical flaws by conservative commentators in their use of america's founding history. he shares his view with david fontana on "after words" on c- span 2. >>, harris and released a report titled "what the fiscal clift deal means for defense." he is not confident congress confine the $2 trillion cuts needed to avoid sequestration c
, obviously, who will be elected the next president of afghanistan. chris lawrence is our pentagon correspondent. chris, hamid karzai did get something very significant from the president of the united states as far as what he sees as his sovereign right. >> that's right. it is getting the prisons that the u.s. military operates turned back over to the afghans and getting the afghan prisoners turned back other to -- >> prisoners being held by the united states in afghanistan or the other nato allies, they will be handed over to the afghans. >> right. as we reported last night, on "the situation room" and earlier today, our sources were telling us, that was what was very important to karzai in terms of sovereignty. he wasn't as caught up on giving sort of the legal protection to u.s. troops. of course we heard him signal to president obama basically he's on board with that, he would get the okay from the afghan people, but in all respects, i think, gloria, you would say he pretty much gave the okay. >> he did. he made it very clear. he said if those issues are resolved, i can go to
of drawdown, i am still getting recommendations from the pentagon and our commanders on the ground in terms of what that would look like. and when we have more information about that, i will be describing that to the american people. i think president karzai's primary concern, and you will hear directly from him, is making sure afghan sovereignty is respected. and if we have a follow-on force of any sort past 2014, it has to be at the invitation of the afghan government, and they have to feel comfortable with it. i will say, as i have said to president karzai, that we have agreements with countries like this all around the world, and nowhere do we have any kind of security agreement with a country without immunity for our troops. that is how i as commander in chief can make sure that our folks are protected in carrying out very difficult missions. i think president karzai understands that. i do not want to get ahead of research in terms of the negotiations that are still remaining on the bilateral security agreement, but from my perspective, it will not be possible for us to have any kind o
for meetings at the pentagon, the state department, on capitol hill, and at the white house. a joint news conference is likely. on friday he will be speaking at georgetown university about u.s.-afghan relations. we will have coverage of his comments at 5:03 p.m. eastern. in washington, hilda solis resigned say she plans to return to california. she is expected to run for a seat on the los angeles county board of supervisors. the president put out a statement saying over the last four years, she has been a critical member of my economic team and we have work to recover from the worst economic downturn since the great depression. part of the statement from president obama on the resignation of hilda solis as labor secretary. we have been covering a number of state of the state addresses. another one this evening, virginia gov. bob mcdonnell and his state of the commonwealth address. he announced a plan that would provide $3.10 billion in transportation funding, replacing the state gasoline tax with a sales tax increase. that is live in an hour-and-a- half. tonight, the 100th birthday annive
concern. in fact, our defense minister is in town today at the pentagon, discussing some of these issues. he has come with a detailed list of the enablers the afghan national army needs, including, as you mentioned, long-range artillery and intelligence- gathering capabilities. fixed-wing and rotary aircraft for transportation. we have been completely dependent for all of these things on nato and our other friends and allies. again, a lot of these equipments are not as expensive as conducting these operations with nato in afghanistan. if there is a political will, it is doable. the same thing as far as the salaries of the afghan national army and police. yes, it is a significant number, considering the afghan economy. or the withdrawal of each international troops from afghanistan, we can sustain 80 afghan national army soldiers on the ground, if there is a willingness to continue with this mission. as you mentioned, to come with a more reasonable definition of success in afghanistan, which has come up to now, then diminished, what it means to succeed here in afghanistan. >> the end of t
states, but he wants forces to remain. he was at the pentagon yesterday meeting with leon panetta and met with with secretary clinton last night. u.s. officials are talking about a zero option after next year with no forces remaining behind in afghanistan. that is an area of concern for president karzai, because he would like a more robust force to help with the training of afghan forces there. kristen welker is at the white house at the east room awaiting the two leaders. kristen, what have we learned about ha they have been discussing? >> well, david, good afternoon. the white house officials just released a statement saying that president obama and president karzai agree that the afghan security forces have exceeded x expectations now leading about 80% of the operations in afghanistan, and that is is significant, because this white house may be lean iing toward a more scaled back troop presence after 2014. for the first time, officials here saying that the president may be open to zero troop presence which critics say that could leave afghanistan vulnerable to destabilization. here is
in afghanistan. similar to the issue of draw- down, i am still getting recommendations from the pentagon and our commanders on the ground in terms of what that would look like. and when we have more information about that, i will be describing that to the american people. i think president karzai's primary concern, and you will hear directly from him to muck is making sure afghan sovereignty is respected. and if we have a follow-on force of any sort past 2014, it has to be at the invitation of the afghan government, and they have to feel comfortable with it appeared, i will say, as i have said to president karzai, that we have a grievance with countries like this all around the world, and nowhere do we have any kind of security agreement with a country without immunity for our troops. that is how by as commander in chief can make sure that our folks are protected in carrying out very difficult missions. i think president karzai understands that. i do not want to get a head of research in terms of the negotiations that are still remaining on the bilateral security agreement, but from my perspecti
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)